The French Impact on the Internet Governance Forum

The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) is an annual event that has enabled participants from many different sectors to mobilize or at least maintain a modicum of a global consensus for a free global Internet ever since its inception in 2006. To me, the IGF serves as an excellent example of the kind of multi-stakeholder engagement that I believe needs to be promoted across the “globalizing” world. Although the IGF has gone through a number of “ups” and “downs” over the years, the 13th IGF, which met in Paris from 12 to 14 November 2018, is definitely one of the “ups”.  In fact, the French sponsorship of this latest IGF has stimulated a revived hope for the IGF and its commitment to a globally open and free Internet. Continue reading “The French Impact on the Internet Governance Forum”

Reflections on Gender and Digital Literacy

As someone who is gradually acquiring a minimum level of digital literacy – and inspired to move up a notch or two – I attended two events recently to learn more about the latest insights on the interplay between gender and digital literacy. One was a gathering of professional women in Lyon, while the other was a global forum on the Internet in Paris.  The first was more focused on gender questions pertaining to digital literacy in business, while the second covered a wider array of subjects, including a broader view on gender itself, having to do with both access and literacy. Even though they were quite different events, it is useful to compare the different approaches to gender questions in the digital world at these two events while also highlighting some of the commonalities Continue reading “Reflections on Gender and Digital Literacy”

Distinguishing Absorption from Integration

 

The significance of immigration as a lightening rod kind of issue is permeating analyses of global politics today but also domestic and regional politics. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary commemorations of the end of World War I,  and because there are concerns about the parallel to what happened in Europe and the US after World War I, it is timely to compare the similarities and differences between Europe and the United States in the handling of this issue. Earlier in the year, one sensed a degree of optimism about the prospects of consensus – for the US, it was an unusual and bizarre dialogue  in January on possible legislation, and for the EU, it was a promising reform proposal in June from the  “Macron/Merkel” duo. Alas, neither reform initiative was successful, and the optimism has become more subdued. It is still there, but recent events in the US and Europe (and elsewhere) would suggest that we have more doom to endure before we reach the end of this downward cycle – even if the mid-term elections in the US might cheer us up in the interim. Continue reading “Distinguishing Absorption from Integration”

The “MLK Après 50” Exhibit and the Legacy of Halloween

Learning can come through reminders about what you knew in the past but had long forgotten. This happened to me the other day as I followed my curiosity to see why a memorial exhibit for Martin Luther King, Junior entitled “MLK Après 50” was being featured at the Palais de Congrès in Grasse. Why would the City of Grasse be hosting such an exhibit on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of his death? It was odd, too, for this to happen in October since MLK’s birthday was in month of January and he had been assassinated in the month of April,.  But maybe there was something more to this exhibit than an MLK memorial. Could this mean something about the crosscutting and broader impact of MLK’s legacy for today’s world of racial and ethnic divisions? Even in Grasse?

Continue reading “The “MLK Après 50” Exhibit and the Legacy of Halloween”

Another Look at Matisse and Picasso

“The Comedy of the Model” is a strange choice of words for someone who is used to using the word “comedy” in the prosaic context of stand-up comedians and shows that make one laugh. One can’t exactly say that the recent exhibit at the Matisse Museum in Nice comparing Matisse and Picasso from the perspective of “The Comedy of the Model” was supposed to make one laugh.  So one does need to stretch it out a bit – as in “The Divine Comedy” referring to a poem, for example, or encompassing the idea of “play-acting” in a sort of light-hearted way. To amuse, so to speak, rather than to laugh uproarously. Continue reading “Another Look at Matisse and Picasso”

Mavericks and Team Players on Migration Policy with Reflections on Kofi Annan and John McCain

From Kofi Annan” the team player” to John McCain “the maverick” would seem like quite a jump. And in many ways it is. Calm versus flamboyant temperament. Collaborator versus boat rocker. Global citizen versus national patriot. Progressive (i.e. more to the left) versus conservative (i.e. more to the right). But both were “greater than life” figures who aspired to do more than their self interest.  Each has been eulogized for rather different reasons. In this commentary, however, I reflect on the impact both of them had in one area of commonly shared concern, migration policy.  Continue reading “Mavericks and Team Players on Migration Policy with Reflections on Kofi Annan and John McCain”